Tag Archives: Science Fiction

249. Introductions: Our Theme and Our Most Anticipated Things in 2015 w/ Renay and Natalie Luhrs

28 Jan

Women, non-binary, and far too many things to love in 2015, oh my!  Natalie Luhrs and Renay join us to talk about our 2015 theme and all the movies, books, TV shows, and comics we’re looking forward to this year.  Well, not all of the things, but certainly a few of them.  Feel free to add your own anticipated things in the comments!

This is just the beginning…

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 249 — Download (MP3)

Show Notes: Continue reading

Around the Podosphere: Podcasts of Note for 1/19/15

19 Jan

The holidays are long over, but there’s still time to catch up on some of your favorite podcasts!  Here are some of our favorites from the last week or so:

On Genre:

Interviews:

On Movies:

On Games:

On Comics:

And there you have it.  What are you listening to?

Book Review: The Genome by Sergei Lukyanenko (Translated by Liv Bliss)

11 Jan The Genome by Sergei Lukyanenko

Sergei Lukyanenko’s name gained popular recognition outside of his native Russia with the translations of his fantasy/horror novels, Night Watch and Day Watch, and their equally successful film adaptations and remakes. It’s not surprising then to see reader interest in translations of his other work, including his science fiction.

However, when it comes to The Genome, diving in simply due to author recognition is not advised. This is a novel where it pays to know not just the author and plot, but also a little about its style and designs. Lukyanenko intended The Genome to be playful, encoding in the final pages a hidden message that translates as: “This novel is a parody of space opera and cyberpunk. The author values your sense of humor.” Continue reading

Video Game Review: Civilization: Beyond Earth (2014)

31 Dec be_box1

At the end of all of the Civilization games, one of the classic winning endings is not to conquer the rest of the world or overawe the other civilizations with alliances and treaties; rather, it is to build a ship and send it to the stars. What would happen when that ship reaches its destination?  In the Mid 1990’s, Sid Meier, creator of the Civilization franchise, explored that in Sid Meier’s Alpha Centauri, a turn-based strategy game with a transhumanist narrative, contacting and, in one of the win conditions, joining with Planet. It is probably the biggest budget videogame to ever explore transhumanism and science fiction, and one of the few to meld an external narrative into a strategy game.

Now, Civilization: Beyond Earth treads into those waters again. Created by Firaxis, Beyond Earth takes the chassis of the Civilization V engine, with its one-unit-per-hex design, and transplants it onto an alien planet. Continue reading

247. On the Blogs — Bloggers Discuss Their Roles at LonCon3 w/ Foz Meadows, Patricia Ash, Liz de Jager, Shaun Duke, and Erin Underwood

23 Dec

Books, blogs, and weird emails, oh my! This recording from LonCon3 features Foz Meadows, Patricia Ash, Liz de Jager, Shaun Duke, and Erin Underwood talking about book blogs, YA, book promotion, and much more.  Though the panel was originally meant to focus entirely on YA book blogging, we took things in a more general direction.

Here’s the panel description:

Bloggers have become an integral part of YA book promotion. How do authors find these bloggers? Why should readers trust their opinions? What are the best book blogs out there right now and what makes them so useful?

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 247 — Download (MP3)

Show Notes:.

Our new intro music is “Time Flux” by Revolution Void (CC BY 3.0).

That’s all, folks!  Thanks for listening.  See you next week.

246. Canadian SF at LonCon3 — #WorldSFTour

22 Dec

Space hockey, Martian curling, and Quebec, oh my!  Recorded at LonCon3 / Worldcon, this panel on Canadian SF features the voices of Eric ChoiKate HeartfieldIra NaymanHayden TrenholmCaitlin Sweet, and Marjolaine Lafreniere.  They tackle Canadian publishing, the history of Canadian SF, thematic differences, and more.

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 246 — Download (MP3)

Canada

Show Notes: Continue reading

Diversity in SF Film: Things to Come (1936)

21 Dec Things to Come (1936) -- H.G. Wells

This is my third post on diversity in Science Fiction films. I started with Metropolis (1927), and then skipped two decades to The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951). Largely, my reason was that there weren’t any options for the 30s or 40s available on Netflix. Apparently, there aren’t very many SF films within that twenty year period.[1] I’ve decided to skip Frankenstein  although the novel is one of the first, if not the first, SF novels — because the classic film has more in common with horror than SF. I feel much the same about King Kong. Therefore, I settled on Things to Come (1936), which is based upon the H.G. Wells’ novel published in 1933 entitled The Shape of Things to Come. I know I’m risking a bit of confusion by going backward here, but I felt it was too important to skip. Also:  keep in mind that I don’t think I read the novel. At least, I don’t remember having read it.[2] So… Things to Come. Continue reading

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