Retro Childhood Review: The Egypt Game

20 Jul

But, actually, that was the way with all of the Egypt Game. Nobody ever planned it ahead, at least, not very far. Ideas began and grew and afterwards it was hard to remember just how. That was one of the mysterious and fascinating things about it.

Not every single book that I read as a child was a science fiction or fantasy novel, just MOST of them. I have a feeling that the cover of Zilpha Keatley Snyder’s Newbery Honor book The Egypt Game must have tricked me into believing it was a fantasy. Surely, with a name like that, it must be a portal fantasy full of mummies, pharaohs, and gods (a childhood fancy that is problematic unto itself). My impression wasn’t entirely incorrect. But it would be more accurate to say that the portal in The Egypt Game is the vivid imaginations of the characters themselves, a magic just as powerful as anything in Narnia.
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Book Review: The Guns Above by Robyn Bennis

19 Jul

 

A pair of intriguing, antagonistic characters, steampunk airships, a dry sense of humor, and feats of derring-do are at the heart of The Guns Above, a debut novel by Robyn Bennis. The novel’s strong focus on the action beats as well as the main characters marry a sense of character along with large helpings of crunchy detail to a finely honed level. Continue reading

Signal Boost #12: A Conversation about Conventions, Economics, and Inclusion

18 Jul

On today’s Signal Boost, Shaun and Jen discuss conventions, the economics of attendance, and how they can be more inclusive. They’re particularly concerned with how convention culture tends to be somewhat exclusive, how conventions often fail utterly at disability access, and how something called WorldCon should MAYBE travel around the world a bit more.

Then they squeeeeeee about this week’s mini-boosts. Make sure you let us know about things that YOU love that we should share in future boosts!

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below): Continue reading

329. Inclusivity in Games — A Discussion w/Lorraine Fryer, Vladimir Barash, and Carlos Hernandez

17 Jul

Magic circles, subverting Cthulhu, and preserving heritage, oh my! Lorraine Fryer, Vladimir Barash, and Carlos Hernandez join Julia Rios to discuss Inclusivity in Games! This discussion tackles the importance of representation, colonization of cultural folklore, and how these game designers have specifically worked inclusivity into the narratives of their games.

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below): Continue reading

Book Review: Nebula Awards Showcase 2017

14 Jul

Since the Nebula Awards’ inception some combination of its winners and nominees has been annually published together in a collection edited by a major genre figure. Unlike typical anthologies or collections, the content isn’t chosen by the editor, but by the members of the Science Fiction Writers of America. Therefore the responsibilities of the editor (this year Julie E. Czerneda) appear minimal, mainly to write the introduction and decide on which category might have its nominees included. Individual stories also include introductions by the authors providing insight into the creation of their work.

Nebula Awards Showcase 2017 thus offers an ideal and affordable digest for seeing what members of the speculative fiction field view as its current best representations. For readers who somehow manage to keep up with all corners of the genre, the collection provides a nice summation and reminder of the current vibe, views, and insights that have gained notice. For the casual or new reader, it offers an opportunity to discover some talented writers and powerful stories. Continue reading

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