Tag Archives: Science Fiction

316. Fantastic Four (2005) — A Torture Cinema “Adventure”

24 Feb fantastic-four-2005

Stretchy weirdos, grumpy CEOs, and clobberin’, oh my! Torture Cinema returns with a special Marvel-icious edition, as selected by our listeners and co-starring none other than veteran Torture Goblin, Michael J. Martinez. We turn our sights to the infamous first Fantastic Four (2005) film, tackling its portrayal of the classic characters, its absurd plot, and much more. We also wonder what the deal is with Mr. Fantastic’s weird arms!

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 316 — Download (MP3)

Show Notes:
Continue reading

Book Review: The Medusa Chronicles by Alastair Reynolds and Stephen Baxter

23 Feb medusa-chronicles-final-cover

Howard Falcon is one of the most interesting characters in the oeuvre of Arthur C. Clarke. The late 21st century test pilot’s crash of an experimental helium-filled airship turns into an opportunity, as his cyborg-like existence mandated in the recovery from the accident makes him the perfect person to do the impossible: make a dive into the upper layers of Jupiter.

The story of Falcon’s dive into Jupiter is in the Nebula award-winning novella “A Meeting with Medusa.”  It is a story frequently anthologized, for good reason. Sense of wonder, pathos and inventive worldbuilding make it a classic. Now, with the approval of the Clarke estate, Hard SF authors Stephen Baxter and Alastair Reynolds have teamed up to tell the continued adventures and history of Howard Falcon, and his world, in The Medusa Chronicles. Continue reading

315. Foz Meadows (a.k.a. The Portalist) — An Accident of Stars (An Interview)

17 Feb an-accident-of-stars-by-foz-meadows

Portal worlds, schoolyard bullies, and magic, oh my! In our second interview for the year, Shaun and Paul talk to Foz Meadows about their debut novel, An Accident of Stars. We explore the novel’s central premise, its feminist message, and so much more!

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 315 — Download (MP3)an-accident-of-stars-by-foz-meadows

Show Notes: Continue reading

314. Djibril al-Ayad (a.k.a. The Editor on Fire) — Problem Daughters (An Interview)

4 Feb

Intersectional feminism, problem voices, and FIRE, oh my! In our first interview of they year, we talk to Djibril al-Ayad about the latest anthology from The Future Fire:  Problem Daughters (an anthology of science fiction & fantasy from the fringes of feminism). We discuss the making of the anthology, being an inclusive editor, the value of intersectionalism, the world today, and much more.

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 314 — Download (MP3)

Show Notes: Continue reading

Book Review: Galactic Empires, edited by Neil Clarke

26 Jan galactic-empires-600

 

In the 1970s Brian Aldiss published a seminal anthology of SF stories. Called Galactic Empires, it was a two-volume set of over two dozen stories set in such realms, with authors ranging from Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov and Poul Anderson to A.E. Van Vogt and Clifford Simak. The age of the stories spanned from the 1940s to the 1970s, not only showing a wide range of themes and ideas revolving around Galactic Empires, their rises, heights and falls, but also showing the breadth of style changes in the genre over that period. It was not only a snapshot of the subgenre, right at the time that Star Wars was dominating the cinema and changing SF forever, but a look backward to the roots of the subgenre as well.

Now, in 2017, Neil Clarke has stepped into the very large shoes that Aldiss has left, and created his own anthology called Galactic Empires. Clarke’s collection of stories have the same remit as Aldiss’: To show the Galactic Empire, in all of its forms, and with a wide range of voices, styles and authors. Clarke’s choices all date from the 21st century. While this does mean that Clarke’s anthology misses the 1980s and ’90s, he does manage to capture more recent eras in glorious diversity. For all of how important the Aldiss anthology was and is, Aldiss’ general overlook of half of the SF field and having an entirely American/British viewpoint was a weakness in his anthology. Only one female author, Margaret St. Clair, was included in Aldiss’ two-volume collection. By comparison, out of the stories Clarke has gathered, nearly half are by women. Further, Clarke’s choices includes significant contributions from the likes of Yoon Ha Lee, Tobias Buckell, and Aliette de Bodard.  Continue reading

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