Tag Archives: Inclusion

338. Indigenous Representation in Horror — A Discussion w/ Darcie Little Badger, Nathan Adler, and Stephen

23 Oct

Jump scares, sacred stories, and contractions, oh my! Darcie Little Badger, Nathan Adler, and Stephen Graham Jones join Shaun Duke and David Annandale to discuss Indigenous Representation in Horror. Our guests share why they enjoy horror, who the real monsters of horror often are, especially given colonial history, what not to do when representing Indigenous stories, the violence inherent in cultural appropriation, and what both brings our guests hope and excites them about the horror genre.

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below): Continue reading

Advertisements

Fabulous and Free in SFF: Fictional. Queer. Here.

17 Sep

Hello everyone!  I’m Becca, the new intern for Skiffy & Fanty!  Long story short, I’m ecstatic to be a part of this amazing community and to lend my own voice to it.  I’m happy to announce that I’ll be writing a few articles about the LGBT+ community within science-fiction and fantasy, and it starts here!  

A significant aspect of these articles is the use of the word “queer,” which has been debated for years within the community.  For me, reclaiming the word has been an important part of my own identity, and is one way I can describe myself and others in this context without fear.  Here at the Skiffy and Fanty Show, we’re on our own journey to represent all of the wonderful people in the LGBT+ community, and we feel that using “queer” as an identifier is a more inclusive and supportive way to do so.  Check out this article from Pride.com for more information! Continue reading

Being Here, Now: Moonshot Vol. 2 and Centering Indigeneity

31 Jul

Welcome to the latest installment of my comics review column here at Skiffy & Fanty! Every month, I use this space to shine a spotlight on SF&F comics (print comics, graphic novels, and webcomics) that I believe deserve more attention from SF&F readers.

This month, I’d like to direct your attention to the anthology Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection Volume 2. (This review contains spoilers!) Continue reading

Signal Boost #12: A Conversation about Conventions, Economics, and Inclusion

18 Jul

On today’s Signal Boost, Shaun and Jen discuss conventions, the economics of attendance, and how they can be more inclusive. They’re particularly concerned with how convention culture tends to be somewhat exclusive, how conventions often fail utterly at disability access, and how something called WorldCon should MAYBE travel around the world a bit more.

Then they squeeeeeee about this week’s mini-boosts. Make sure you let us know about things that YOU love that we should share in future boosts!

*Note: Jen conflates SFWA with WSFS. SFWA is NOT in charge of the Hugos, WSFS is!

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below): Continue reading

Guest Post: Growing up in Fandom in the 1970s, by LJ Cohen

14 Jun

I’m not sure if this still holds true today, but if you came of age in the 1970s, were a strong early reader who had read through all the books specifically written for children, and you were lucky enough to have a sympathetic librarian, you’d be directed to the science fiction and fantasy shelves.

At least that’s my story. The Heinlein juveniles had been published a decade before I was born, but they were the first genre books I read. From there, I found all the Lensman books — written even earlier! I may have only been 10 or 11 when I read these, but even then I was frustrated by the insistence that only one special, fierce woman — to be born in some far future — could be a Lensman. Lenses were objects of power that amplified the qualities within a person. The message I got was that girls, as a rule, didn’t deserve power and couldn’t wield power. That I didn’t deserve power; that I was wasn’t good enough. It angered me that girls weren’t the ones leaping up to explore the stars. Asimov’s Robot books fascinated me, but the only woman portrayed in them — Susan Calvin — was more robotic than the robots. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: