Tag Archives: Genre Fiction

Signal Boost #27: K. Arsenault Rivera (The Tiger’s Daughter) and Stacey Berg (Echo Hunter 367 Duology)

21 Nov

In today’s episode of Signal Boost, Jen talks K. Arsenault Rivera about her debut novel, The Tiger’s Daughter. K talks about the narrative structure of the novel, the importance of queer representation, how her Kung Fu film obsession helped her write the action sequences, and gives us a great break down of the important characters.

Then Stacey Berg, author of Dissension and Regeneration, joins Paul to tell us about her character driven, post-apocalyptic Echo Hunter 367 Duology, how they were shaped by a very specific scene and what inspired the post-apocalyptic secular society she created.

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below): Continue reading

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Signal Boost #26: A Conversation about All the Star Wars

14 Nov

On today’s Signal Boosts, Shaun and Jen take a moment to squee about the fact that there are going to be THREE WHOLE NEW STAR WARS MOVIES AND A TV SHOW AND OMG! SQUEEEEEE!!! They’re moderately more coherent than that as they tackle what type of story Rian Johnson might tell. Then Jen moves them into both a squee about the new character, Rose, and a rant about jewelry.

And then we get to our subliminal messaging mini-boosts!

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below): Continue reading

Signal Boost #25: Mike Brooks (Dark Deeds) and S.A. Chakraborty (City of Brass)

7 Nov

In today’s episode of Signal Boost, Jen talks to Mike Brooks about the third installment of his Keiko series, Dark Deeds. Mike gives us a recap of the the first two books, which he calls dirty space opera, and sets us up for the crew’s shenanigans as they try to pull off a heist and save a crew-member. He also discusses how he worked to make this series his own given its Firefly inspired origins.

Then S.A. Chakraborty, debut author of The City of Brass, joins Jen to tell us about the medieval middle eastern inspirations of her novel, how it started out as historical fan fic, how a djinn (not the Disney version) might be influenced by a long-view of human history, and how Nahri is forced to make her way in Daevabad, the City of Brass. We also get a glimpse into how The City of Brass found a home through the #DVPit pitch process! (Apologies for the audio; sometimes the internet just doesn’t want to cooperate!)

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below): Continue reading

Top 10 Posts and Episodes for October 2017

4 Nov

October is gone. Like many months this year, it wasn’t a good one, but it did end with a lovely bit of political schadenfreude. Add in the free candy and maybe October wasn’t so bad after all.

In the Skiffy and Fanty echo chamber, we’ve been watching the stats with amusement. You’ve been enjoying our stuff, both new and old. That gives us happy feels. Here are the most popular posts and episodes you enjoyed this month: Continue reading

339. Maximum Overdrive (1986) — A Torture Cinema Halloween Special “Adventure”

31 Oct Maximum Overdrive Poster

Cocaine, man eating machines, and AC-DC, oh my! In this special Halloween Horror edition of Torture Cinema, Shaun, David, and Alex are joined by Zena, the Real Queen of Horror, to review the 1986 Stephen King written and directed “horror” film, Maximum Overdrive. Apparently, even Stephen King couldn’t get Stephen King right. The crew discusses how stupid the premise is, eviscerate the despicable characters, muse on where one might find a goblin semi-truck, and share a story that makes the reality of this coked out travesty even more horrifying than the movie. But at least Zena liked the movie, and that means our work here is done. Continue reading

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