Indy Genre: Spring

27 Mar Spring-poster

Bearing the subtitle “Love is a monster,” the movie poster for Spring boasts a color scheme like a sunset, and an overlay of the faces of two lovers. If you ignore the tentacles and claws rising up against the silhouette of the woman central to the poster, this could almost stand in for another goddamn Nicholas Sparks movie. Thankfully, there’s far more complexity, meat, and… tentacles to it than that.

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263. Rethinking the Hugo Awards w/ TheG, Cora Buhlert, and Jason Snell

27 Mar

Fandom, Radical Categorization, and Hugo kvetching, oh my!  TheG, Cora Buhlert, and Jason Snell join us to discuss the confusion over the Hugo categories, ways to fix them to make voting easier and more “fan oriented,” and the problems with the system as it currently stands — and maybe a little bit about politics, too.

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 263 — Download (MP3)Hugo Award

Show Notes:

Our new intro music is “Time Flux” by Revolution Void (CC BY 3.0).

That’s all, folks!  Thanks for listening.  See you next week.

Book Review: Gemsigns by Stephanie Saulter

26 Mar Gemsigns by Stephanie Saulter

The price of humanity’s use of computing technology was high. The Syndrome caused degenerative physiological and neurological problems to an ever increasing amount of humanity. The wired age, as we in the 21st century might know, meant a radical change in humanity. Even as genetic engineering came up with cures for The Syndrome, the sheer amount of labor and effort needed to keep the world going during the transitional period meant that a different sort of genetically engineered being was needed. Beings designed who could lift more, think more, do more, to keep society functioning even as the world came to grips with the fallout from The Syndrome. Called Gems, after a century of propping up the world, these beings are no longer necessary for the functioning of society, but how can humanity keep them in shackles? And what rights does a superhuman being designed in a test tube really have? Or should have?

These issues come to a head in Gemsigns, the debut novel by Stephanie Saulter. Continue reading

262. Brenda Cooper (a.k.a. The Space Farmer) — Edge of Dark (An Interview)

25 Mar

Giant space rings, transhumanists, and space cows, oh my!  Brenda Cooper joins Shaun and Paul to discuss her latest novel, Edge of Dark.  We tackle Brenda’s love of science fiction, the transhumanist themes in her work, character development, and the wonders of space.  Plus much more!

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 262 — Download (MP3)Edge of Dark by Brenda Cooper

Show Notes:

Our new intro music is “Time Flux” by Revolution Void (CC BY 3.0).

That’s all, folks!  Thanks for listening.  See you next week.

The Disquieting Guest — Ib Melchior: Tivoli Nights and Rat-Bat-Spider-Crabs

25 Mar angry-red-planet

Ib Melchior passed away on March 13, at the age of 97. His death was rather overshadowed in genre circles by those of two far more famous figures in the field, so I’m going to take a few moments now to remember the contributions of the novelist, screenwriter and director. While his most notable contributions have been more SF than horror, there are enough horrific elements in his work that I think he has a place in this column.

The most high-profile works associated with him are ones where his involvement was in one way or another indirect. He wrote the English-language script for Mario Bava’s SF/horror masterpiece Planet of the Vampires (1965). His concept Space Family Robinson (later a comic book) was, he claims, plagiarized by Irwin Allen as Lost in Space, and indeed, when the film version came along in 1998, Melchior was a paid consultant. And his short story “The Racer” was the basis for Paul Bartel’s brilliant (and ever-more-topical) satire Death Race 2000 (1975).* Continue reading

Geekomancer Under Glass: Recent Media – March 2015

23 Mar The Walking Dead Season 5

Hello, Skiffy and Fanty crew! It is I, your resident Geekomancer, back from my travels on the internet through memes and gifs and pilots and digital bundles. And this time, I’ve brought back word of recent goings-on in the geekiverse. A TV pilot for an award-nominated comic, a new story for a beloved geek icon, and the latest developments in a cable TV juggernaut. Enjoy!

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261. Carrie Patel (a.k.a. Mayor of Mole City) — The Buried Life (An Interview)

20 Mar

Underground cities, murder-y murders, and snarky detectives, oh my!  Carrie Patel joins us to discuss her new novel, The Buried Life.  We discuss worldbuilding, writing detectives, the nature of power and class, gaming, and much more!

We hope you enjoy the episode!

Note:  If you have iTunes and like this show, please give us a review on our iTunes page, or feel free to email us with your thoughts about the show!

Here’s the episode (show notes are below):

Episode 261 — Download (MP3)The Buried Life by Carrie Patel

Show Notes:

Our new intro music is “Time Flux” by Revolution Void (CC BY 3.0).

That’s all, folks!  Thanks for listening.  See you next week.

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